SESSION HANDOUTS AND POWERPOINTSRECORDINGS AND ARCHIVES

SCHEDULE
SESSION DESCRIPTIONS



Thursday November 10th – NAfME Pre-Conference Sessions and Joint Opening Reception
8:30 AM –5:00 PM
NAfME Standards and Assessment Workshop
Pre conference event - separate registration required
4:30 – 7:30 PM
SEADAE Arts Assessment Symposium Registration Opens in Mustang 5
7:15 PM – 9:30 PM


Grand Opening Reception – Happy Hour and Jam Session For SEADAE & NAfME Conferences
Longhorn E






SEADAE National Arts Assessment Symposium Session Descriptions


Friday November 11, 2016
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Sessions are one hour in length with a 30 minute break between each.


8:30 – 9:30

Keynote Session


Shift Happens: The Status of Arts Assessment in the United States
8:30 AM – 9:30 Friday November 11th
Mustang 4

(repeated 11:30 AM – Saturday November 12th)

Dr. Linda Lovins - State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, retired
Marcia McCaffrey - New Hampshire Department of Education

State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education Immediate Past President


As education in the United States shifts to the Every Student Succeeds Act, this session will reveal current policy and practices in arts assessment and underscore the opportunities ahead at the local and state levels due to changes in federal legislation. Based on data gathered in 2015 from members of the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, this session will report on the drivers of arts assessment and the impact of policy, professional development, and funding in designing and administering arts education assessments. Presenters will share trends and outcomes based on survey results. Specific findings, such as the influence of Race to the Top waivers on arts assessment practices, help illuminate the place of arts assessment across the nation.
SEADAE JOINT SESSION: OPEN TO ALL SEADAE & NAfME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES


10:00-11:00


Partnerships in Assessment: The Texas Music Assessment

Friday November 11 10:00-11:00 Mustang 1
Michele Henry - Baylor University
Frank Coachman - Texas Music Educators Association
The Texas Music Assessment (TMA) was born out of a collaboration between the Texas Music Educators Association and the Texas Music Administrators Conference. Through this twelve-year partnership, a state-wide music curriculum (based on state-mandated standards) was developed; a question bank for knowledge-based content was compiled; skill-based content was identified along with testing procedures and protocols; and a partnership with Music Prodigy, Inc. allowed a single-platform delivery system for the assessment to be realized. Come find out about the challenges and solutions that were discovered throughout the development process.




Diving Deeper Into the Shift: Responding to the Status of Arts Assessment Across the Nation Report
Friday November 11 10:00-11:00 Mustang 2
Joyce Huser, Kansas Department of Education - Incoming SEADAE President – Moderator

Beth Lambert – Maine Department of Education

Dr. Dale Schmid – New Jersey Department of Education

Dr. Julie Palkowski – SEADAE President - Wisconsin Department of Education

Debbie DeFrain – Nebraska Department of Education

Dr. Peggy Wenner – Idaho Department of Education
This panel discussion and talk-back session will allow attendees a closer view of trends and practices in arts assessment from a regional point of view. Panelists include regional representatives of the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, those members who represent collective states from geographic areas of the country. Join this group as they explore further implications and outcomes related to the report.


The Use of Balanced Assessments in the Arts: Lessons Learned from Arts Achieve
Friday November 11 10:00-11:00 Mustang 3
Paul King - New York City Department of Education Office of Arts and Special Projects
Tom Cahill - Studio in a School
Susanne Harnett - Metis Associates
In 2010, the five-year Arts Achieve project was funded by two United States Department of Education grants: an Arts Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grant and an Investing in Innovations (i3) grant. Arts Achieve was developed to address the dearth of high quality assessments in the arts, which has led to the arts to be marginalized within the school day. NYC has been a leader in setting benchmarks for student achievement in the arts through the development of the Blueprints for Teaching and Learning in the Arts, which were first drafted over ten years ago. Development of assessments to examine students’ progress toward meeting these benchmarks was a natural next step for NYC, and the Arts Achieve project enabled this to occur. During the session, we will describe the development of the Benchmark Arts Assessments, which are authentic performance-based assessments. Assessment development teams were assembled to create the assessments in each of four arts disciplines (visual arts, music, theater, and dance) and at three grade levels (5th grade, MS and HS). The assessments contain written and artistic tasks, both of which are performance based. Written performance tasks include short answer, extended writing items, and multiple choice. Artistic performance tasks vary by art form and are all scored using rubrics developed by the assessment development teams and tested by the evaluation team. The assessments also include opportunities for students to respond to both professional and student-produced masterworks. Participants will have opportunity to engage in one of the arts assessments, both going through the student experience as well as being active in the adjudication process and understanding first-hand some of the issues that arise around inter-rater reliability. The core component of the Arts Achieve project was professional development for arts teachers in the use of data from the Benchmark Arts Assessments, as well as ongoing formative assessment practice, in which teachers learned to use formative assessment as an integral aspect of their instruction. During the discussion, we will discuss how Arts Achieve aimed to increase teacher practice and student arts achievement by providing support to art teachers on the use of balanced assessment and the integration of technology in instruction and assessment. We will also discuss the critical relevance of the Arts Achieve work given the current movement toward performance-based assessments, including the implications of the recent ESSA legislation with regard to assessment for teaching and learning. Additionally, the overall successes and challenges, exemplars of best practices, and lessons learned from the project will be discussed.




Digital Process-folio Assessment in Theatre Arts: Assessment through Reflective Practice
Friday November 11 10:00-11:00 Mustang 4
Jackie deMontmollin - The University of Houston School of Theatre & Dance
This session will begin in an examination of student process-based digital portfolios from both the BFA Theatre Education program and the Summer Master of Arts for Theatre Educators program at The University of Houston. Participants will step through examples of documented reflective process-folio examples that are used as both formative and summative assessment tools. Examination of development of learning targets, process documentation, reflective practice that empowers student progress, and student perceptions of the process will be examined and discussed. Formatting/planning for implementation of this type of assessment tool in the arts, discernment in artifact selection, creating an environment for reflective practice through digital process-folios will be explored.


Assessing Growth in the Arts - The Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative
Friday November 11 10:00-11:00 Mustang 6
Tim Katz & John Farley - Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Jacque Burke - Battelle for Kids
The Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative (OAAC), a consortium of rural, urban, and suburban school districts, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, Battelle For Kids, and the Ohio State University, has created an innovative suite of authentic, performance-based arts assessments to measure student growth for K-12 dance, drama/theatre, music, and visual arts.
These 45 arts assessment examples:
• Align with arts education standards in Ohio - Were field-tested for validity, reliability, and ease of implementation
• Are available with professional learning resources such as scoring rubrics, administration guides, and examples of student work, developed to build the assessment literacy of arts educators
• Help capture the growth of students in dance, theatre/drama, music, and visual arts
11:30 – 12:30
Arts Integration for Assessment Literacy
Friday November 11 11:30-12:30 Mustang 1
Dr. Byron Richard & Dr. Pam Paulson - Perpich Center for Arts Education
A focus on Arts integration design and implementation can help build teacher assessment literacy. Participants experience processes for building and reflecting on deeply connected standards-based arts-integrated learning experiences. Using tools of Understanding by Design to help teachers across content areas imagine and plan curriculum with essential and enduring connections, a curriculum design process is explained and a process is demonstrated for teachers to use as they collaboratively review samples of student work.


Washington State Assessments – The Impact of State Policy
Friday November 11 11:30-12:30 Mustang 2
Anne Banks - Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
InWashington State has performance assessments developed for dance, music, theatre, and visual arts and a law that requires all districts to report their use of these assessments or other assessment strategies. In this session, we will discuss the impact of this policy in the development and use of performance assessments in the arts and explore what participants’ states have in place and strategies for moving forward.




Tennessee Student Growth Measures System: Teacher Leadership in the Peer Review Process
Friday November 11 11:30-12:30 Mustang 3
Dr. Dru Davison & Roland Wilson & David Potter
Shelby County Schools
In an age of educational scrutiny, teacher leadership is a vital component in teacher evaluation and student growth. This session will focus on the role of peer reviewers in the TN Student Growth Measures System. Building on previous presentations about the TN Student Growth Measures System, this presentation will concentrate on the peer review component. This session is geared toward participants who are interested in becoming leaders in their schools, districts, and states in working to develop student growth and teacher evaluation systems. By the end of the session, participants will leave with knowledge about the design and role of the peer review process and the tools needed to implement a successful peer-review component within a student growth measures system. Perspectives will be shared by a music administrator, a secondary music educator, and an elementary music educator with differing numbers of years using the system on the peer review process. Specific topics will include the role of peer reviewers, the training process, and how the process encourages teacher leadership. Since the implementation of the system, teachers have been empowered as reflective practitioners and instructional leaders throughout the process of constructing and submitting a portfolio of student growth. The peer review component furthers this goal by asking teachers to apply their expertise and experience to new situations as they review portfolios that were constructed by their peers. This session will consider ways teachers are equipped to become effective reviewers and leaders in the portfolio process. The session will include an overview of the peer review process, an interactive activity, reflective discussion about the activity, and time for questions and discussion.




Assessment in a Choice, Voice, Challenge Environment
Friday November 11 11:30-12:30 Mustang 4
Melissa Gallagher - Pennsylvania Art Education Association
O. David Deitz – Pennsylvania Department of Education
Assessment is a challenge in any class where there are multiple right answers and can be particularly frustrating when teachers are trying to encourage creative thinking and administrators are focused on rigorous attention to meeting state standards through testing. The Choice, Voice, Challenge Model for Creative Instruction (Emma Gillespie Perkins and Mary C. Carter, Art Education 2011) of lesson design is easy to reflect upon model for creative problem solving in visual art education. This session will explore ways in which this model can be used to embrace state and national standards as well as assessment of student work in ways that will not crush creativity but rather give students valuable feedback and encouragement.




Including Students with Disabilities in Equitable Arts Assessment
Friday November 11 11:30-12:30 Mustang 6

Dr. Sharon M. Malley – Consultant
Dr. Alice-Ann Darrow - College of Music, Florida State University
Dr. Jean Crockett - College of Education, University of Florida
With the passing of the Every Student Succeeds Act, states and school districts will hold schools accountable for the progress of all students, and must maintain dedicated resources and supports for America’s vulnerable children, including students with disabilities. Arts education is included in the definition of a “well-rounded” education, thus, arts assessment and accountability for students with disabilities must be considered. ESSA allows for multiple measures of student learning and progress, along with other indicators of student success. Members of the team that assured that students with disabilities were included in the development of the new National Core Arts Standards and the Model Cornerstone Assessments, will address the broad implications and specific practices of including students with disabilities in arts education assessment.


LUNCH BREAK 12:30 -1:30 - Lunch on Your Own
Café Session with Michigan Assessment Consortium
Mustang 5



1:30 -2:30


Assessing 21st Century Skills

Friday November 11 1:30–2:30 Mustang 1
Ken Skrzesz – Maryland State Department of Education
Many fine arts skill-based assessments have been created to measure the acquisition of technique and craft of discipline-specific art forms. This session will widen the lens of student learning in fine arts courses to offer recommendations of ways to assess 21st Century skills - shifting arts education from the caboose to the engine of every school.




Arts PACE: New Hampshire's Performance Assessment Accountability Model
Friday November 11 1:30-2:30 Mustang 2

Marcia McCaffrey - New Hampshire Department of Education
Brian Fanning - Weare Middle School
One key element of an accountability system is that it provides opportunities for meaningful learning and culls data to inform continuous improvement for teachers, learners, and programs. ESSA allows states to select indicators beyond those the federal government requires, including additional measures of student outcomes. Since 2005 New Hampshire state policy has emphasized competency-based education. Rules were further refined in 2014 to push competency-based education to a higher scale, and now New Hampshire is looking at including performance assessments as part of the state's ESSA accountability plan. In support of a well-rounded education, the NH Performance Assessment for Competency Education (PACE) now includes music and visual arts. This session will examine the process for developing performance assessment in the arts for PACE, report out on early field tests, and provide insights from the state Department of Education and a middle school music teacher engaged in the PACE Arts project.




Assessing Children's Use of Singing Voice
Friday November 11 1:30–2:30 Mustang 3

Dr. Joanne Rutkowski - Pennsylvania State University
In this session the presenter will share the development of the "Singing Voice Development Measure" (SVDM) and how to use it in classroom, ensemble, and research settings. SVDM is a tool that helps teachers assess their students' use of singing voice enabling them to provide instruction to help all children be successful singers. It is also useful to researchers exploring issues related to children's singing achievement. Strategies for using SVDM during classroom activities (informal assessment) as well as to more formally document children's achievement will be addressed.




Assessment that matters: Using the habits of mind to develop performance tasks
Friday November 11 1:30–2:30 Mustang 4

Leslie Gates, Ph.D. - Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Mary Elizabeth Meier, Ph.D. – Mercyhurst University
This session will 1) investigate a philosophical orientation to assessment as authentic to the artistic process, 2) provide examples of how arts educators can document and support students’ creative idea development and then assess using the Studio Habits of Mind as a framework. Finally, the presenters will identify the challenges in aligning learning goals, performance task development, and assessment. We will engage the participants in an activity in which they envision the type of evidence/documentation that would be required in order to provide evidence that students have met the learning goal.




Organizing Successful Multi-Site Assessment Development
Friday November 11 1:30-2:30 Mustang 6
Dr. Scott C. Shuler & Richard Wells

Solutions Music Group
Developing and benchmarking high-quality, classroom-ready arts assessment requires engaging and managing teachers at multiple sites in a compelling, personal collaboration while overcoming challenges of distance, scheduling, and individual accountability. Participants in this session will discuss proven strategies to overcome these challenges, based on two decades of successful arts assessment development in Connecticut that eventually engaged arts educators in five states in both live and virtual professional learning communities. The session will include a demonstration of the capabilities of MeasureSuccess.org, a not-for-profit site designed to facilitate PLCs around assessment and student work that is currently being used successfully in the music MCA piloting project.





3:00 – 4:00


Recommended Policies to Support Assessment of Student Learning in the Visual Arts Education Classroom
Friday November 11 3:00-4:00 Mustang 1
Dr. Constance Lutz - Arts Administration, Education & Policy - The Ohio State University
Educational policies and practices around classroom assessment can leverage or limit learning in the visual arts. In this session, topics for state, district, and school level policies and practices that support student learning in visual art through assessment will be presented and discussed. These topics were derived from the findings from the presenter’s research on visual art teachers’ classroom practices of assessment for student learning. Findings showed the presence or absence of policies and practices had positive or detrimental impacts on student learning. Policy topics include use of scope and sequence, teacher professional development, student teacher mentors, length of class period, and room specifications. Preparing the language for creating or revising policies to take back to your site will be written collaboratively during the session.




Moving from Arts Education Standards to Practice: Using Formative and Summative Assessment to Guide Instructional Practice
Friday November 11 3:00 – 4:00 Mustang 2
Dr. Dale Schmid - New Jersey Department of Education
This session will examine the newly published New Jersey Model Curriculum Framework Anchor Assessments for the Visual and Performing Arts. The framework is intended as a means of setting instructional goals and unearthing evidence of learning aligned to the New Jersey Student Learning Standards and NCAS Standards. The driving force behind the creation of the Model Curriculum Anchor Assessments was the desire to help teachers understand ways to interpret and communicate assessment results that transmit sufficient understandable detail to guide learner’s future actions and guide instructional practice. The main focus will be on data mining and the use of assessment as an instructional tool versus a means of accountability. Attendees will have the opportunity to deconstruct data sets and surmise instructional implications from implicit trends within the data.




New Assessments for Arts Educator Preparation
Friday November 11 3:00-4:00 Mustang 3

Suzanne K Canali - New Hampshire Institute of Art
Dr. Mark DeTurk - University of New Hampshire
It is a data-driven world in all levels of education. The arts are not exempt, especially when preparing future educators. Governing authorities do not want to review 3-ring binders that are splitting at the seams with hard-copied exemplars. Instead, they are asking how data is used to make meaningful decisions at the candidate and program level. This session will focus on new assessment protocols for New Hampshire's educator preparation programs. Suzanne Canali will present a macro view of how educator preparation programs in New Hampshire are managing the state's requirement to prove they are making data-informed decisions. Mark Deturk will present a micro view of how all educator preparation programs have adopted the Teacher Candidate Assessment of Performance (TCAP), modeled after California's PACT and similar to EdTPA. All future teachers in New Hampshire will be required to take the TCAP. It has been in development and field trials for more than two years. A one size fits all has its benefits, but also its limitations for fine and performing arts education programs. As a result of this workshop, participants will gain and share insight about assessment changes and challenges that face all of our future fine and performing arts educators.




Design, Build, Review: A Quality Assurance Toolkit for Creating and Scoring Performance Tasks
Friday November 11 3:00–4:00 Mustang 4
O. David Deitz - Pennsylvania Department of Education
This session is designed to be a practical “how-to” process for developing arts-based performance task assessments based on a quality assurance approach. Participants will be introduced to the Design/Build/Review method for creating and scoring performance tasks. A “toolkit” of quality assurance checklists and protocols will be presented and utilized throughout the session. Materials and slides will be provided that can be used as a train-the-trainer training.




Common Music Assessments Initiative: Classroom-Proven Units/Tasks, Scoring Scales, and Student work
Friday November 11 3:00–4:00 Mustang 6
Richard Wells & Dr. Scott C. Shuler - Solutions Music Group
Over a span of two decades, Connecticut arts educators participated in a series of standards-based curriculum and assessment projects that culminated in the development of Common Arts Assessments in music and visual arts. Educators from five states helped design, pilot, and refine these units with embedded assessment, scoring tools, and benchmarked student work.
This session will present for discussion and potential use music performance tasks for grades 2-8 emphasizing Creating (improvisation and composition) and Performing (singing). Participants will discuss age-appropriate strategies incorporated into the tasks for scaffolding student reflection and self-assessment. Participants will also learn how to access and adapt these tasks using the innovative MeasureSuccess.org platform.


Accountability and Achievement Through Student Led Assessment
Friday November 11 3:00–4:00 PM Ft. Worth 7
Janae Copland and Ryan Mould
Assessment in the music classroom does not have to be overwhelming and can lead students toward higher levels of standards based achievement. This session will explore the concept of student led, evidenced based assessment in the music classroom. This process can be a tool when completing state mandated teacher evaluations, classroom placements, monitoring student growth, among many others.
NAFME JOINT SESSION: OPEN TO ALL SEADAE & NAfME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES
4:30 – 5:30


Practical Portfolios and Performance Assessments that Reveal Learning; A potential Today and Tomorrow
Friday November 11 4:30–5:30 Mustang 1
Lorinda Rice - Lincoln Public Schools
Jean Detlefsen, PhD - Consultant, Arts Education

Michelle Hrbek - Lincoln Northeast High School
Michelle Clifford - Lincoln High School
Participants have worked with national standard reviews, regional labs of West Ed and West Stat on National Art Education agendas. These presenters are researchers, administrators, and long and short-term practitioners in the visual arts. They have written and struggled with assessment throughout their careers. This dream team is carving out time to look at the evolution of assessment, the demands of today’s and future classrooms, working together to develop assessment models that can become a part of daily practice. Due to the constant demands in education, teachers are seldom able to work from theory to practice and build innovative models of assessment to support curriculum design.



Ethical Intersections: Assessment and Copyright in Digital Times
Friday November 11 4:30–5:30 Mustang 2

Dr. Linda Lovins - State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, retired
Copyright issues? In assessment? Yes! As we design large- and small-scale authentic assessments using real-world examples (e.g., audio and visual recordings, digital art reproductions), we have a legal and ethical responsibility to protect the intellectual property of our peers in the visual and performing arts. What are our obligations? Why does it matter (besides a potential cost of up to $150,000 in fines per infringement, plus attorney fees and court costs)? What CAN we use? Isn't it okay if it's for educational purposes ... or if we cite the artist/author/composer/performer? Dr. Linda Lovins will offer a layperson's guidelines regarding intellectual property, fair use, public domain, and resources across the arts.




Evaluating the Visual Art Teacher, What is the Administrator Looking For?
Friday November 11 4:30–5:30 Mustang 3
Tom Tobias - Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
In Missouri, our very thorough and comprehensive teacher evaluation instrument based on student growth has caught some visual arts/ arts teachers off guard. Many of the difficulties that arts teachers and administrators have encountered come from a lack of communication and understanding that arises from uncertainty about what each party is looking for. This presentation looks at the potential misunderstandings and suggests a finding common ground approach that potentially benefits all three parties: teacher, student and administrator.







Impact of Colorado Assessment Literacy Efforts on Arts Disciplines
Friday November 11 4:30–5:30 Mustang 4
Karol Gates, Angela Landrum, Donna Goodwin & Judi Hofmeister – Colorado Department of Education
With the new and, now, mandated emphasis on student assessment, coupled with the high-stakes nature of teacher evaluation, arts educators need to know :
• The purposes and functions of an arts specific high quality assessment system
• Where and how to access arts assessment resources
• When and why an arts assessment is being given
• How to select and/or design arts assessments for various purposes
• How to determine the knowledge and skills an arts assessment is designed to measure
• How to use arts assessment data to make instructional decisions, provide feedback to students, and improve student achievement -- how that process works, where to start, the steps involved for instructional, programmatic, and educator evaluation purposes.
As such, the objectives of the Colorado Assessment Literacy Program, which was funded by Colorado’s Race to the Top Program and developed in partnership with the Colorado Content Collaboratives and the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, & Student Testing (CRESST), are to
• Build state and district capacity to provide sustainable assessment literacy support applicable to all 10 core disciplines including the arts
• Develop programs, services and guidance to educators to help them design, implement, and use assessments effectively to guide and support instruction
• Provide educators with clear guidance, including content-specific examples, on how to effectively utilize assessment results and information.
This session will review the components of the Colorado assessment framework, interim assessments development details and formative assessment elements and how arts educators are using and informing the overall state assessment literacy efforts to ensure arts education needs are met.


A Pilot of Model Cornerstone Assessments for National Music Standards
Friday November 11 4:30–5:30 Mustang 6

Dr. Frederick Burrack & Dr. Philip Payne
Kansas State University
The Model Cornerstone Assessments (MCAs) provide a framework into which teachers integrate their curriculum while using common learning expectations and rubrics. Each school program has a unique population and circumstances that guide curricular decisions. Respecting the professional autonomy of teachers that know their students and educational culture, the MCAs provide adaptable assessment tasks that will assist students through the components of each artistic process, allowing them to demonstrate the quality of learning associated with the performance standards. The assessment rubrics have been designed to allow for task flexibility while document the quality of student learning. They have been designed and tested to be used in the classroom by teachers, therefore eliminating the necessity for external evaluation. If administered with integrity by the practicing teachers, the MCAs are documented to be valid assessments of student learning and can reliably document student growth throughout a music program.







Saturday November 12, 2016
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Sessions are one hour in length with a 30 minute break between each
.
8:30 – 9:30

Authentic Assessment of Creative Works
Saturday November 12 8:30–9:30 Mustang 1
Erik Jensen & Kishore Channabasavaiah - rateCreative
rateCreative provides an assessment tool for problem-based creative learning in authentic environments. The shared tool utilizes teachers’ expertise through collaborative rating of complex student learning, resulting in authentic, interactive feedback for students engaged with problem-based learning. This feedback is aligned with standards and utilizes bench-marked works that adjust over time relevant to student progress with respect to the standards. A rubric generator, that is standards-based, is used to align teacher developed lesson plans for student learning products within and among similar classes for various forms of crowd-sourced assessment. This assessment model provides an interactive feedback loop for students, teachers, school, and states that can be customized for various levels of interaction. It also highlights the teacher as the expert rater in providing quality assessment.




Mid America SEADAE Arts in Action
Saturday November 12 8:30–9:30 Mustang 2
Debra Wehrmann DeFrain - Nebraska Department of Education
Lana Hallmark – Arkansas Department of Education
Joyce Huser – Kansas Department of Education
Tom Tobias – Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Kelsey Kling – The Texas Education Agency


Overviews of various new state projects: examples include modifying MCA into teaching modules to drive instruction rather than assessment, new initiatives in accountability, teacher/principal evaluation frameworks. While specific to states of the Mid-America region, much can be learned from each project to tweak to your needs and benefit your students in your state.




Assessing Growth Over Three Years: A Middle School Visual Art Model
Saturday November 12 8:30–9:30 Mustang 3
Stacey L. Miller, Pennsylvania Department of Education Facilitator - Middletown Area School District
O. David Deitz – Pennsylvania Department of Education
This session will explore a growth assessment model that spans a three year timeframe. By using portfolios and assessing big ideas, this model is a realistic approach to assessing student achievement when minimal classroom time is provided. The methodologies presented will acknowledge ways in which assessment can help to frame a spiral curriculum, as well as ways to apply this model within a teacher evaluation protocol.




Imagine the Possibilities: Discussion of an International Symposium on Assessment in Arts Education
Saturday November 12 8:30-9:30 Mustang 4
Dr. Timothy Brophy - University of Florida

Marcia McCaffrey - New Hampshire Department of Education - SEADAE, Immediate Past President
The International Symposium on Assessment in Music Education initiated by Dr. Timothy Brophy, University of Florida, has brought experts together from around the globe for five dynamic gatherings to inform assessment practices and research in music education. What would be the benefits of expanding this model to include dance, media arts, theatre, and visual arts? How would an international sharing of arts assessment practices, policies, and perspectives influence this work on a local, national, and global scale? How can you contribute to this evolution of arts assessment learning? Joining this conference virtually, Dr. Brophy will outline the planning components required of an international symposium. Questions and remarks from attendees will shape the dialogue. Marcia McCaffrey will facilitate the session.
SEADAE JOINT SESSION: OPEN TO ALL SEADAE & NAfME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES







Authentic Artistic Assessment: The Statistically Reliable Next Generation
Saturday November 12 8:30–9:30 Mustang 6
Professor Raymond E. Veon -Caine College of the Arts - Utah State University
Scott Bartholomew - Utah State College of Education
A quality art curriculum does not simply reproduce knowledge but empowers students to generate new knowledge and personal artistic vision. But quantitative arts assessments can be reductive and far-removed from real world artistic production, while performance assessments can be unevenly implemented and statistically unreliable. Can we assess authentic arts learning with the statistical reliability found in traditional standardized tests while rewarding play, creativity, spontaneity, risk-taking and open-inquiry? Other countries are ahead of us in this area. The Adaptive Comparative Judgment (ACJ) E-Portfolio is a qualitative assessment method with a stunning 0.95 reliability co-efficient – equaling that of standardized math tests. The ACJ method is also a valuable tool for professional development of teachers and identifying areas of strengths and improvement in arts programs. It has been replicated thousands of times in multiple countries and has been piloted in the US in Georgia and Utah school districts. This presentation provides a complete overview, explanation of the statistical methodology, its foundation in cognitive learning research, plus case studies, resources, and hands-on experiences with this arts assessment method that also has implications for transforming assessment in other subject areas.


10:00 – 11:00


Click and Learn!
Pepper Online Learning System for Self-Paced Professional Development with Embedded Assessment
Saturday November 12 10:00–11:00 Mustang 2
Jack McLaughlin, Ed.D. & Reggie Smith, M.Ed.
PCG Education
This workshop will examine how self-paced and blended models of online professional development with embedded assessment can help districts change their PD practices to support teachers and promote effectiveness in the classroom.
Pepper is a vibrant, online learning community where educators can have anytime, anywhere access to rigorous, high-quality professional development content. Pepper offers a variety of learning opportunities and activities through courses, instructional resources, classroom teaching videos, and a bank of technology-enhanced items to help teachers prepare for high-stakes assessments. Beginning in 2017, Pepper online learning will include professional development courses created in conjunction with the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education focusing on standards based arts instruction, including introductions to the new national core arts standards.

Educators in Pepper can share portfolios of work, build personal peer networks, engage in course discussions, and work together as they implement standards based education aligned with the new 2014 arts standards. Pepper is built on the powerful edX platform, the Cambridge-based education partnership founded by Harvard University and M.I.T., to support two important missions: improving online education, and advancing teaching and learning through research.





Assessing State Music Teaching Standards through Electronic Portfolios
Saturday November 12 10:00-11:00 Mustang 3

Dr. Frederick Burrack & Dr. Philip Payne
Kansas State University
This session will provide an example of assessing understanding and proficiency of State Music Teacher Standards through online electronic portfolios throughout an undergraduate teacher education program. Addressed will be the development and implementation of the process, confirmation of validity and scoring reliability, predictability of the electronic portfolio to the practice of teaching as scored with the Danielson Framework, and usefulness in teacher development.







MCA’s as a Measure of Student Practice
Part I of Exploring the Model Cornerstone Assessments in Policy & Practice
Saturday November 12 10:00-11:00 Mustang 4
Susan McGreevy Nichols - National Dance Education Organization

Jim Palmarini - Educational Theatre Association

Pamela Paulson, Ph.D. - NCCAS Media Arts Committee

Dr. F. Robert Sabol - Perdue University

Dr. Scott C. Shuler - Solutions Group

Lynn Tuttle - National Association for Music Education

Cory Wilkerson - NCCAS Project Manager
What does a model look like that measures student practice against the new National Core Arts Standards? What choices are made in creating a model cornerstone assessment - and how might that influence how the assessment is utilized in the classroom? Join members of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) and learn about the development of the Model Cornerstone Assessments (MCAs). Based on Model Cornerstone Tasks of Wiggins and McTighe, the MCAs were developed along with the National Core Arts Standards as exemplars of authentic standards-based assessment that could be embedded in an arts education classroom. x.


Michigan Arts Assessment Resources: For Voluntary Use Within School Improvement and Teacher Effectiveness
Saturday November 12 10:00-11:00 Mustang 6

Ana Luisa Cardona & Dr. Ed Roeber & Kathy Dewsbury-White
Michigan Assessment Consortium
An introduction to Michigan’s arts education voluntary assessment system the Michigan Arts Education Instruction and Assessment project (MAEIA) and its’ new web hub– www.MAEIA-ArtsEdNetwork.org that houses arts education teacher-developed resources including 350 K-12 performance assessments in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts that promote student learning and program improvement in the arts. Members of MAEIA’s management team discuss how the resources were developed and address issues of developing student assessment and teacher effectiveness resources within a voluntary system with the state’s recent teacher effectiveness legislation. A description of the project’s next phase of work and issues related to disseminating, training, and sustaining the use of these resources through blended virtual and face to face professional learning and partnership and community development will also be presented.


11:30 – 12:30


Student-Centered Assessment
Saturday November 12 11:30-12:30 Mustang 1

Mel Pontious - State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, retired
Judy Kirby - Carthage College

Lynn Molenda - Alverno College
This session will present the findings of a multi-year action research project by music and art teachers, using a student-centered model in which students have a significant role in driving their own learning. The session takes the position that curriculum, instruction, and assessment are really a unitary system and that each is involved in a cycle of mutual influence. Therefore, students are given a strong role in determining the learning project, the instructional/learning phase, and (formative) performance self-assessment embedded in the instructional/learning phase. Besides using self-assessment as a tool for learning, the process is an excellent metric of the depth of student learning. The process itself is teacher and student friendly. Benefits that accrue from this are enhanced students' motivation, ownership, sense of self-efficacy, depth of learning, and learning to learn.




Shift Happens: The Status of Arts Assessment in the United States
Saturday November 12 11:30-12:30 Mustang 2
Dr. Linda Lovins - State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, retired
Marcia McCaffrey - New Hampshire Department of Education

State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education Immediate Past President
As education in the United States shifts to the Every Student Succeeds Act, this session will reveal current policy and practices in arts assessment and underscore the opportunities ahead at the local and state levels due to changes in federal legislation. Based on data gathered in 2015 from members of the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, this session will report on the drivers of arts assessment and the impact of policy, professional development, and funding in designing and administering arts education assessments. Presenters will share trends and outcomes based on survey results. Specific findings, such as the influence of Race to the Top waivers on arts assessment practices, help illuminate the place of arts assessment across the nation.
SEADAE JOINT SESSION: OPEN TO ALL SEADAE & NAfME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES




Arts Assessment for Dallas ISD/ Plan, Implementation and Results
Saturday November 12 11:30-12:30 Mustang 3

Elaine Tomas & Aaron Ware & Kathy Williams-Palmer - Dallas Independent School District
This will be a panel discussion regarding the three year planning, implementation and results of art and music assessments for the large urban Dallas Independent School District. These assessments include both written and performance portions. The panel will include the director of elementary art and music; art and music teachers who served as writers of the assessment; and leaders in the district evaluation and assessment department who were directly connected to the implementation of the arts assessment throughout the district.



Benchmarking Student work using the Model Cornerstone Assessments
Part II of Exploring the Model Cornerstone Assessments in Policy & Practice
Saturday November 12 11:30-12:30 Mustang 4
Susan McGreevy Nichols - National Dance Education Organization

Jim Palmarini - Educational Theatre Association

Pamela Paulson, Ph.D. - NCCAS Media Arts Committee

Dr. F. Robert Sabol - Perdue University

Dr. Scott C. Shuler - Solutions Group

Lynn Tuttle - National Association for Music Education

Cory Wilkerson - NCCAS Project Manager
Over the last two school years, NCCAS has piloted the MCAs in classrooms across the nation. This session will provide an overview of how the MCAs were created (and why); what has been learned through the piloting of the MCAs (including planned revisions to the assessments). Participants will explore what evidence of students meeting standard looks like based on the MCAs with hands on benchmarking of student work in Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theatre and Visual Arts.


Arts Assessment Item Development as Professional Development: Reflections from Michigan
Saturday November 12 11:30-12:30 Mustang 6
Ryan Shaw - Capital University
Stuart Chapman Hill - Webster University
Cynthia Taggart - Michigan State University
Since 2013, the Michigan Arts Education Instruction and Assessment (MAEIA) project has brought together arts educators from a variety of grade levels and locations to draft an aspirational blueprint of a “gold standard” school arts education program, a program review tool for assessing progress toward this standard, and a suite of performance-oriented assessment items. We--the presenters--served as item developers and found the experience challenging: how could we create assessments that were ambitious but manageable, differing in difficulty but able to be used in mixed-ability courses, flexible but rigorous? How do we develop items that measure what teachers already do in their classrooms, while also challenging teachers to think more broadly about music teaching and learning? These challenges aside, we were somewhat surprised at how stimulating and edifying the process was. In sum, it was a form of professional development that gave us space to think about assessment, curriculum, and the interplay between the two.
In this session, we present interview data from conversations with assessment item developers alongside actual items developed during the MAEIA work. We will offer suggestions for those who wish to embark upon developing large-scale arts assessments about how to select participants and how to make the assessment-development experience as meaningful as possible for those involved. We will discuss how teachers can use the process of assessment development as a means of improving practice across a school or district.




Lunch on Your Own - 12:30 – 1:30



1:30 – 2:30


The Portfolio Approach: How portfolio practice in arts integrated classroom projects provides a window to student learning
Saturday November 12 1:30-2:30 Mustang 1

Joseph Spilberg & Scott Sikkema – Chicago Arts Partnerships

Larry Scripp – Center for Music and the Arts in Education
For the past 12 years, Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education has explored the arts integrated education portfolio as a means for teacher and student growth. Through various iterations and an evolving research methodology, the organization, in collaboration with researchers, has found consistent and compelling evidence supporting the portfolio as an ideal vehicle for student arts and academic growth.





Evidence in Arts Assessment
Saturday November 12 1:30-2:30 Mustang 2

Michelle Livek - University of Missouri
Tom Tobias - Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
How do arts educators make learning visible? What about the nature of the arts should be valued through assessment mechanisms? This session will offer a method of making learning visible for the arts. The method was initially created for visual arts assessment, and was then transformed for music and theater when the mechanism was affirmed as an effective common assessment within Professional Learning Community. The method was piloted for 5 years in a mid-western high school and middle school. Join the conversation about how transforming the assessment can accentuate the experiential, performative, and generative nature of arts education!




Mobile Online Arts Assessment Tool (MOBART): Changing how classroom teachers teach, integrate, and evaluate the arts. Research and practice from the Integrating Arts through Common Core to Ensure Student Success (iACCESS) project
Saturday November 12 1:30-2:30 Mustang 3
Dr. Corey Greenlaw & Robert Bullwinkel - Fresno County Office of Education
David Reider - Education Design, Inc.
Kim Morin - California State University, Fresno
The iACCESS project engages 100 grade 3-5 teachers in ten Fresno, CA schools in developing and implementing multi-week units integrating theater arts, visual arts, and media arts with social studies and ELA. Responding to the common scenario of classroom teachers (often not well versed in arts instruction or arts assessment) who assess all student art as “excellent,” regardless of quality and evidence of standards, iACCESS’s primary focus is to help teachers learn how to integrate the arts into other curricular areas by training them to fairly and reliably evaluate student art work. Just as in ELA and math, not everything a student produces is of the highest quality, but everything a student produces has potential to become the highest quality if proper modification and improvement is enacted. Rarely is this done in the arts. After a hybrid of online and face-to face training, teachers use the innovative MOBART online assessment tool to assess student artwork in theatre and visual arts. MOBART provides a real-time electronic student work repository and grading platform that is accessible by peer teachers and researchers. Teachers use mobile technology (tablets, phones, computers) to quickly capture and assess student work, providing a basis for improvement of arts skills for students through assessment-based professional learning for teachers.




Customizing the Model Cornerstone Assessments for Your Classroom
Part III of Exploring the Model Cornerstone Assessments in Policy & Practice
Saturday November 12 1:30-2:30 Mustang 4

Susan McGreevy Nichols - National Dance Education Organization

Jim Palmarini - Educational Theatre Association

Pamela Paulson, Ph.D. - NCCAS Media Arts Committee

Dr. F. Robert Sabol - Perdue University

Dr. Scott C. Shuler - Solutions Group

Lynn Tuttle - National Association for Music Education

Cory Wilkerson - NCCAS Project Manager
Participants will discuss the implications of utilizing MCAs in their own settings and changes they would consider making to these models. What choices are made in creating a model cornerstone assessment - and how might that influence how the assessment is utilized in the classroom? Based on Model Cornerstone Tasks of Wiggins and McTighe, the MCAs were developed along with the National Core Arts Standards as exemplars of authentic standards-based assessment that could be embedded in an arts education classroom. .Join members of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) and learn about the development of the Model Cornerstone Assessments (MCAs).


Good in good out: Assessing quality arts instruction’s impact on social and emotional learning
Saturday November 12 1:30- 2:30 Mustang 5

Greg MacPherson & Lisa Schmidt & Sam Williamson - Big Thought
This session will introduce Big Thought's instructional quality initiative as an example of highlighting assessment strategies from a system level all the way down to individual instructors. By setting exact expectations for our instructors and holding them accountable for facilitating learning activities that meet our standards it allows us to ensure that student outcomes, specifically around social and emotional learning, are tied to our program design enabling replication and growth. Using this example we will lead group through a self-exploration of their own strategies to help them asses how well their student outcomes are tied to program objectives.




Developing Innovative Approaches to High School Arts Assessments
Saturday November 12 1:30-2:30 Mustang 6

Dr. Ed Roeber - Michigan Assessment Consortium - Katy Colletti - Creative Possibilities
Michele Agosto - Buffalo Public Schools - Bradley Morrison - Ossining Schools
In addition to the variety of assessments used at the high school level—summative assessments, college entrance tests used for state accountability, and end-of-course summative tests—there are innovative approaches to high school academic assessment that are being developed. This session will focus on one such effort—the New York Arts Pathway program which serves as a high school certification program to permit eligible students to receive a high school diploma with a focus on the arts (or other areas such as mathematics, science, and career tech). The work in the arts is innovative for several reasons:
• The disciplines of the arts require a broader set of measures than typical selected response or written response items
• Students who leave high school having “majored” in the arts often go on to college and major in some aspect of the arts.
• Making sure that students are ready for success in college and beyond requires shared work between K-12 and university educators.

The goals of the high school academic assessments in the arts is to move this certification program that may be based on several different components:
• District end-of-course assessments that meet state criteria for alignment to state curricula and meet technical standards for assessment quality
• Individual Arts Assessment Plan—a capstone project protocol defined collaboratively by the student and her/his instructors
• Development and implementation of an online consensus moderation scoring process for the assessment of student (pathway) work by state arts educators (K-12 and university).
This session will present state efforts to implement this model, the challenges in creating such an innovative assessment design, and the current status of the arts pathway program.


3:00 – 4:00


Teaching and Assessing Student-Centered Learning in the Arts
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 1
Demaris Hansen - The Hartt School - University of Hartford
Arts Education fosters an naturally active learning environment. Students develop artistic skills through creating, performing, and responding to their art. But, the national arts standards and teacher evaluation models also call for the development of artistic literacy through authentic participation. In this session we will explore how artists think about, refine, and present their art and the ways in which those practices have fostered authentic learning environments such as having students self-and peer-evaluate, engage in cooperative learning and individual and group problem solving to become "leaders of their own learning." Classroom tested formative and summative assessments for 21st century skills of self-direction, problem-solving, communication, and collaboration will be shared and discussed in relation to these instructional strategies. In addition, participants in the session will explore how school districts are now incorporating student-centered learning into their revised district curricula and teacher evaluation. A rich variety of resources and models will be shared with participants.




Arts Assessment for Learning: Transforming Teacher Practice and Student Achievement in the Arts
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 2

Maria Palma - New York City Department of Education & Joanna Hefferen - ArtsConnection
This session will provide participants with credible and successfully implemented strategies that leverage formative assessment as a driver of student learning in the arts and effective teacher practice at a district level. Supported by a USDOE grant, this blended model of professional development will be presented that engaged over 200 NYCDOE arts teachers (Dance, Music, Theater and Visual Arts) in professional learning communities focused on improving student arts achievement through formative assessment. This session addresses the relationship between assessment and evaluation, and introduces assessment strategies that promote authentic arts learning, support learner independence, and improve the quality of student feedback and revision. The session will provide district leaders with a framework for engaging school leaders, arts teachers in action research focused on formative assessment that transforms practice. Formative assessment in practice videos and a toolkit of tools and practices will be shared from the new website: www.artsassessmentforlearning.org




Examining Engagement: Student Assessment In and Through the Arts
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 3

Bryan Powell & Ryan Zellner - Little Kids Rock
This session will review best practices in arts assessment through a review of assessment instruments created by the Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University. Specifically, this session will explore the element of student engagement and examine how an increased understanding what engagement looks like in can inform youth development assessment metrics.


How Might MCA’s Connect to Policy?
Part IV of Exploring the Model Cornerstone Assessments in Policy & Practice
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 4
Susan McGreevy Nichols - National Dance Education Organization

Jim Palmarini - Educational Theatre Association

Pamela Paulson, Ph.D. - NCCAS Media Arts Committee

Dr. F. Robert Sabol - Perdue University

Dr. Scott C. Shuler - Solutions Group

Lynn Tuttle - National Association for Music Education

Cory Wilkerson - NCCAS Project Manager
This session will address specific local, state, and national questions: How might MCA's connect with policy, especially accountability systems for students, schools, and teachers? What has NCCAS learned during the piloting of the MCAs to inform a discussion around policy? How does the new federal educational law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) contribute to a conversation about quality arts assessment practices such as those embedded in MCAs? How do MCA's relate to the NAEP Arts Assessment and a possible revision of NAEP Arts for 2024? And how do all these questions connect with arts education advocacy in general?




Teacher Development and Evaluation in the Arts - Opportunities for Arts Literacy as a Whole School Reform Initiative
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 5
Jeremy Holien - Perpich Center for Arts Education
Advance and inform systems-based education assessment efforts by engaging key strategies learned from the Minnesota Teacher Development and Evaluation in the Arts initiative that is supported by the Americans for the Arts SP3 policy grant in collaboration with the Perpich Center for Arts Education and Minnesota Department of Education. Areas of focus will include:

  • How artistic literacy is a key component of both teacher and student assessment practices
  • How authentic student growth measures can be ascertained in a variety of learning environments
  • How the practice of implementation science is being used as a way to support a system of continuous improvement across Minnesota and beyond




Analyzing Student Work to Improve Instruction and Show Student Growth
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Mustang 6
Denese Odegaard - Fargo Public Schools
Analyzing student work is important to show student growth and to inform next steps in instruction. This process can be used to test the reliability of a rubric, to write a rubric or to calibrate the scoring of work using a common rubric as a group of teachers. In this process, one aspect of student work is studied to reveal what students are doing successfully and what instruction has to change to improve student work. In a group setting, teachers can discuss strategies that are successful with others to learn how to change instruction. A rubric may have to be written or rewritten after using this process to determine student proficiency. In teacher evaluation, results of this analysis can be used to show student growth.


It’s All About the Singing
Self Assessments, Data Collection and RTI for the Choral Classroom
Saturday November 12 3:00-4:00 Ft. Worth 1 & 2
Treva Maneval
This session provides the materials to begin a comprehensive assessment system for choral classrooms. Education is data-driven, and many music instructors are called on to obtain relevant, meaningful data on each student’s mastery of concepts being taught. This is highly difficult in a music classroom. These materials provide self-assessments for the students, data-collection forms, tracking tools and RTI ideas. The session also teaches a step-by-step approach on how to implement this into your classroom.
NAFME JOINT SESSION: OPEN TO ALL SEADAE & NAfME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES


4: 30 – 5:30
Symposium Closing Session
Saturday November 12 4:30-5:30 Mustang 4
Join conference organizers SEADAE Incoming President Joyce Huser and Past President Marcia McCaffrey in the Symposium reflection and wrap up.